World day for cultural diversity for dialogue and development

World Day for Cultural Diversity for Dialogue and Development

One group, Youth for Human Rights Florida, enhances dialogue by helping others to understand their human rights through the education of The Universal Declaration of Human Rights in youth-oriented booklets and DVDs.

 The World Day for Cultural Diversity for Dialogue and Development is often observed in countries that are composed of a varieties cultural backgrounds and histories, as this day acknowledges the importance of these different ways of life.  The United States of America is truly a country of diversity.

According to the United Nations, the General Conference of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) adopted the Universal Declaration on Cultural Diversity in Paris, France, on November 2, 2001. It was the 249th resolution adopted at the 57th session of the United Nations General Conference. Although the declaration was the culmination of years of work, it was adopted in the wake of the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. This reaffirmed the need for intercultural dialogue to prevent segregation and fundamentalism.

The United Nations proclaimed 2002 as the Year for Cultural Heritage. At the end of that year, on December 20, 2002, the General Assembly of the United Nations declared May 21 to be the World Day for Cultural Diversity for Dialogue and Development.

This ties in with Human Rights Day 2009 the United Nations advocated “Embrace Diversity – End Discrimination” and to continue to do so throughout 2010. On Human Rights Day Youth for Human Rights Florida joined other Youth for Human Rights groups around the world in the first annual “International Walk for Human Rights” to raise awareness of the need for all to demand their rights and to respect the rights of others.

 As the UN promotes diversity, Youth for Human Rights Florida is working to get the Universal Declaration of Human Rights taught in schools throughout Florida, and beyond. The youth president, Dustin McGahee, discusses the importance of teaching human rights in schools. “Human Rights must be taught in schools. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights was created in 1948 with and stated these rights are to be taught in schools as a solution to peace, but 61 years later they are still not a required curriculum.”  McGahee became involved in educating others of their human rights as he is inspired to action by the words of humanitarian L. Ron Hubbard, “Human rights must be made a fact, not an idealistic dream.”

 Youth for Human Rights Florida educates people of all ages about their human rights, both in and out of the classroom. There are many ways to learn about human rights, but Youth for Human Rights International (YHRI) a non-profit, secular organization founded in 2001 by educator Dr. Mary Shuttleworth, created an easy to understand video of each of the human rights designed for youth. In less than a minute the youth can learn one of their human rights. There is also a teacher’s guide for those educators. For more information on Youth for Human Rights and free DVD downloads on the 30 human rights go: www.youthforhumanrights.org.

To contact Youth for Human Rights Florida contact: dustin@youthforhumanrightsflorida.org

International year of youth – 2010 –

International Year of Youth – 2010 –

TAMPA BAY, JANUARY 12, 2010 – The year 2010 was named by the United Nations as the “International Year of Youth: Dialogue and Mutual Understanding”.

So as to raise dialogue between groups and create mutual understanding, Youth for Human Rights Florida is reaching out to youth of all races, cultures, religions and ages to help others to understand their human rights and respect the rights of others through the education of The Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

According to the United Nations a “youth” is from the age of 15 to 24, with approximately one billion youth live in the world today or 18% of the world’s population are “youth”.

Some of the ideas of the United Nations General Assembly, Sixty-fourth session on Social Development, are stated as: “(a) Creating effective channels of cooperation and information exchange among young people, their national Governments and other decision makers…” and “…(b) Encouraging and promoting youth-led organizations and the important role they play in promoting young people’s civic engagement and in providing non-formal education through financial and technical support and the promotion of their activities…”

As the UN promotes “civic engagement”, Youth for Human Rights Florida is working to get the Universal Declaration of Human Rights taught in schools throughout Florida, and beyond. The youth president, Dustin McGahee, has already written to Governor Charlie Crist to ask to meet with him to discuss the importance of teaching human rights in schools. “Human Rights must be taught in schools. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights was created in 1948 with and stated these rights are to be taught in schools as a solution to peace, but 61 years later they are still not a required curriculum.”

But human rights advocate Dustin McGahee won’t sit idle waiting for Governor Crist, as this month alone Youth for Human Rights Florida will be participating in an Interfaith Conference, walking in honor of Martin Luther King Jr. Day, and taking part in an educational conference for Black Heritage Week; all to create a more peaceful world by educating others of their human rights. McGahee became involved in educating others of their human rights as he is inspired to action by the words of humanitarian L. Ron Hubbard, “Human rights must be made a fact, not an idealistic dream.”

Youth for Human Rights Florida educates people of all ages about their human rights, both in and out of the classroom. There are many ways to learn about human rights, but Youth for Human Rights International (YHRI) a non-profit, secular organization founded in 2001 by educator Dr. Mary Shuttleworth, created an easy to understand video of each of the human rights designed for youth. In less than a minute the youth can learn one of their human rights. For more information on Youth for Human Rights and free DVD downloads on the 30 human rights go: www.youthforhumanrights.org.

To contact Youth for Human Rights Florida contact: dustin@youthforhumanrightsflorida.org

Systems of formal education education is a concept, referring to the process in which students can learn something: instruction refers to the intentional facilitating of learning toward identified objectives, delivered either by an instructor or other forms

importance of education ,definition of education,articles on education,education quotes

Systems of formal education

Education is a concept, referring to the process in which students can learn something:

  • Instruction refers to the intentional facilitating of learning toward identified objectives, delivered either by an instructor or other forms.
  • Teaching refers to the actions of a real live instructor designed to impart learning to the student.
  • Teaching refers to learning with a view toward preparing learners with specific knowledge, skills, or abilities that can be applied immediately upon completion.

from the outskirts of Bucharest, around 1842.

Primary (or elementary) education consists of the first few years of formal, structured education. In general, main education consists of six or eight years of schooling starting at the age of five or six, although this varies between, and sometimes within, countries. Globally, around 70% of primary-age children are enrolled in primary education, and this proportion is rising.[1] Under the Education for All programs driven by UNESCO, most countries have committed to achieving universal enrollment in primary education by 2015, and in many countries, it is compulsory for children to receive primary education. The division between primary and secondary education is somewhat arbitrary, but it generally occurs at about eleven or twelve years of age. Some education systems have separate middle schools, with the transition to the final stage of secondary education taking place at around the age of fourteen. Schools that provide primary education, are mostly referred to as primary schools. Primary schools in these countries are often subdivided into infant schools and junior schoo          Secondary education

Main article: Secondary education

In most contemporary educational systems of the world, secondary education consists of the second years of formal education that occur during adolescence.[citation needed] It is characterized by transition from the typically compulsory, comprehensive primary education for minors, to the optional, selective tertiary, “post-secondary”, or “higher” education (e.g., university, vocational school) for adults.[citation needed] Depending on the system, schools for this period, or a part of it, may be called secondary or high schools, gymnasiums, lyceums, middle schools, colleges, or vocational schools. The exact meaning of any of these terms varies from one system to another. The exact boundary between primary and secondary education also varies from country to country and even within them, but is generally around the seventh to the tenth year of schooling. Secondary education occurs mainly during the teenage years. In the United States and Canada primary and secondary education together are sometimes referred to as K-12 education, and in New Zealand Year 1-13 is used. The purpose of secondary education can be to give common knowledge, to prepare for higher education or to train directly in a profession.

The emergence of secondary education in the United States did not happen until 1910, caused by the rise in big businesses and technological advances in factories (i.e. emergence of electrification), that required skilled workers. In order to meet this new job demand, high schools were created and the curriculum focused on practical job skills that would better prepare students for white collar or skilled blue collar work. This proved to be beneficial for both the employer and the employee, because this improvement in human capital caused employees to become more efficient, which lowered costs for the employer, and skilled employees received a higher wage than employees with just primary educational attainment.

In Europe the grammar school or academy existed from as early as the 1500s, public schools or fee paying schools, or charitable educational foundations have an even longer history.

Higher education, also called tertiary, third stage, or post secondary education, is the non-compulsory educational level that follows the completion of a school providing a secondary education, such as a high school, secondary school. Tertiary education is normally taken to include undergraduate and postgraduate education, as well as vocational education and training. Colleges and universities are the main institutions that provide tertiary education. Collectively, these are sometimes known as tertiary institutions. Tertiary education generally results in the receipt of certificates, diplomas, or academic degrees.

Higher education includes teaching, research and social services activities of universities, and within the realm of teaching, it includes both the undergraduate level (sometimes referred to as tertiary education) and the graduate (or postgraduate) level (sometimes referred to as graduate school). Higher education in that country generally involves work towards a degree-level or foundation degree qualification. In most developed countries a high proportion of the population (up to 50%) now enter higher education at some time in their lives. Higher education is therefore very important to national economies, both as a significant industry in its own right, and as a source of trained and educated personnel for the rest of the economy.[citation needed]Adult education

Main article: Adult education

Adult education has become common in many countries. It takes on many forms, ranging from formal class-based learning to self-directed learning and e-learning. A number of career specific courses such as veterinary, medical billing and coding, real estate license, bookkeeping and many more are now available to students through the Internet.

Alternative education

Main article: Alternative education

Alternative education, also known as non-traditional education or educational alternative, is a broad term that may be used to refer to all forms of education outside of traditional education (for all age groups and levels of education). This may include not only forms of education designed for students with special needs (ranging from teenage pregnancy to intellectual disability), but also forms of education designed for a general audience and employing alternative educational philosophies and methods.

After phonics, what

After Phonics, What?

For the past several decades, parents and teachers have labored to teach children to read by helping them to learn the sounds of each letter and sounding them out to form words. The overall method is generally referred to as “phonics.” Unfortunately, the term “phonics” has mistakenly become a ubiquitous term meaning “the study of all letter sounds.” The simplicity of implementing phonics into a teaching technique is also the basis of its greatest problem in teaching the reading of English.

The word “phonics” is a shortened term for “phonetics.” Many languages can be said to be phonetic in the sense that one letter always represents the same sound. Beginning readers, sadly, soon learn that written English is not consistently phonetic. This makes written English one of the more difficult languages for people to learn to read and spell.

In English, the consonant sounds are phonetic in most instances. As a result, we can generally use phonics methods to begin to teach students to read the consonant letters. Of course, students eventually must learn a few exceptions to the universal application of phonics to the pronunciation of consonants.

The situation is substantially different for vowel letters. In English, vowel sounds are not coded phonetically. This is because every vowel letter can represent several vowel sounds. For example, the vowel letter “a” is read differently in the words “at” and “ate”, and “e” is read differently in “bed” and “bead”. Students (both children and adults) can readily see the visual distinction between “at” and “ate”, but are too often at a loss about why we read the letter “a” as a short vowel in the “at” and a long vowel in “ate”. Using a learning-to-read technique based entirely on phonics presents beginning readers with unwarranted confusion, stress and frustration when they try to “read” vowel letters phonetically.

There is a relatively new method that systematically helps beginning readers to know when each of the different sounds associated with a specific vowel is applicable and when it is not. It’s called syllabics.

The approach taken by syllabics is substantially different from phonics. When students have mastered reading all the consonants and the six main consonant blends, they are ready for the only thing left for them to learn: how to read the vowel letters, a, e, i, o, and u.

The secret to correctly reading a vowel letter lies in the way the word is spelled. Every word has a spelling code that clearly tells the student how to read each vowel letter in that word. Because they are the easiest to learn, syllabics begins with the shortest words (one syllable words). After students have mastered the basic spelling codes, which enable them not only to recognize how virtually any one-syllable word is pronounced and spelled, they are almost ready to leap forward to multi-syllable words.

The most common spelling code is what has been arbitrarily termed by many reading experts as the “VC” code. A word with the VC code contains only one vowel letter and ends with a consonant letter.

Just consider the words “at”, “sat”, and “scratch”. The rule for a word that has the VC spelling code is to read the vowel with a short vowel sound. When students have mastered the VC code, they can correctly apply it to any word with the VC code, “sounding-out” every consonant and vowel in order to “read” the word.

Applying the simple rule makes it completely unnecessary for students to guess or to memorize how to pronounce the letters.

For the student and the teacher, the most interesting aspect of the syllabics method is that there are only six codes to learn. Once they are all mastered, students will have conquered the challenges presented by phonics-based programs: They can now read virtually every English word. The exceptions are the groups of words that don’t comply with any known rule.

You can write a good paper

You Can Write a Good Paper!

Research Paper….. What are your associations of this word? Some will answer: college, higher, education, perspective job. When I come to recollect writing my first Literature Research Paper, my imagination draws a depressing picture of piles of books, newspapers, magazines, large library reading rooms and sleepless nights at the computer.

Education is vital in our competitive society and each of us is likely to face the problem of creating his/her own writing. At schools, we write compositions, short essays, reports. As students we have to generate essays, research papers, term papers, etc. If we decide to continue our education in graduate school, again we are to submit articles, reports, and finally theses and dissertations.  

But no college, no university provides you with simple realistic advice how to write, for example, your own Psychology Research Paper.

 That is why both students and post graduates are dashing about with no clear idea how to produce this titanic work of 30 – 50 pages. Nobody just explained them how to do it…

There are so many requirements for completing your research paper or essay. Some tutors demand your own ideas and opinions, some professors cut them out, others expect their students make a close study of the given literature, and so on.

 Are there any universal requirements, some common rules that will facilitate the writing process? I believe that they exist.  Otherwise I would not be writing this article….

 Each of us is creative and imaginative. Some of us know it, others hide it, and some just need to reveal it. But for most of us writing a research paper seems just a waste of time. Even if the topic does not interest you very much, working on it will help you to develop your creative potential, to get more confident as you will learn to write on your own.

Any writing from an essay to thesis can be written in a short period of time and does not require any peculiar talents. What you really need is concentration and right course of your efforts. The following Research Paper Help.

 Tips will direct your energy and attempts into the right course:

– Choose your topic very carefully and thoughtfully

– Select and study the informational sources very seriously

– Start planning from the very start!

– Write — express the experts’ opinion

– Share your point of view (back it up with the solid evidence)

– Keep your writing style distinct and clear.

– The conclusion flows naturally from the preceding paragraphs.

– It is time to write an introduction! Yes!  (I know what am saying)

– Arrange your paper according to the standards.

– Be proud of your work!!!!

Research Paper….. What are your associations of this word? Some will answer: college, higher, education, perspective job. When I come to recollect writing my first Literature Research Paper, my imagination draws a depressing picture of piles of books, newspapers, magazines, large library reading rooms and sleepless nights at the computer.

Education is vital in our competitive society and each of us is likely to face the problem of creating his/her own writing. At schools, we write compositions, short essays, reports. As students we have to generate essays, research papers, term papers, etc. If we decide to continue our education in graduate school, again we are to submit articles, reports, and finally theses and dissertations.

But no college, no university provides you with simple realistic advice how to write, for example, your own Psychology Research Paper. That is why both students and post graduates are dashing about with no clear idea how to produce this titanic work of 30 – 50 pages. Nobody just explained them how to do it… There are so many requirements for completing your research paper or essay. Some tutors demand your own ideas and opinions, some professors cut them out, others expect their students make a close study of the given literature, and so on.

 Are there any universal requirements, some common rules that will facilitate the writing process? I believe that they exist.  Otherwise I would not be writing this article….

Each of us is creative and imaginative. Some of us know it, others hide it, and some just need to reveal it. But for most of us writing a research paper seems just a waste of time. Even if the topic does not interest you very much, working on it will help you to develop your creative potential, to get more confident as you will learn to write on your own.

Any writing from an essay to thesis can be written in a short period of time and does not require any peculiar talents. What you really need is concentration and right course of your efforts. The following Research Paper Help

Tips will direct your energy and attempts into the right course:

Choose your topic very carefully and thoughtfully
Select and study the informational sources very seriously
Start planning from the very start!
Write — express the experts’ opinion
Share your point of view (back it up with the solid evidence)
Keep your writing style distinct and clear.
The conclusion flows naturally from the preceding paragraphs.
It is time to write an introduction! Yes!  (I know what am saying)
Arrange your paper according to the standards.

Be proud of your work!!!!

Practice test

000-934 Practice Test

000-934 Exam
IBM Tivoli Identity Manager V5.0 Implementation
Exam Number/Code : 000-934
Exam Name : IBM Tivoli Identity Manager V5.0 Implementation
Questions and Answers : 150 Q&As

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Exam : IBM 000-934
Title : IBM Tivoli Identity Manager V5.0 Implementation
1. Identification of target platform business processes is essential to which IBM Tivoli Identity Manager configuration task?
A. Adoption policies
B. Account recertification
C. Organization administration
D. Provisioning policy join directives
Answer: B

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220-301 A+ CORE HARDWARE(2003 Objectives)

Advanced algebra not for every kid

Advanced Algebra not for Every Kid

In December, the Ohio Legislature approved a new “core curriculum” that today’s Ohio fifth-graders will have to successfully complete in order to graduate from high school. Beginning in 2010, students will be required to pass four years of mathematics, which must include both basic and advanced algebra. Ohio’s action mirrors similar legislation the state of Michigan enacted last March.

Currently, only a handful of states mandate that all students pass two years of algebra to graduate from high school, but more states are considering such a requirement. There are only two justifications for a state to require that a graduating high school student master a particular subject – it is of vital interest to the student, society, or both.

Please reminisce for a moment and recall the last time you found that it was in your self-interest to be able to apply the quadratic formula. You know, the one in which the opposite of the coefficient of the first-degree term added to, or subtracted from, the square root of four times the product of the coefficient of the second-degree term and the constant is subtracted from the square of the coefficient of the first-degree term – all of which is divided by twice the coefficient of the second-degree term.

If you are an algebra teacher, algebra student or algebra parent, making use of the quadratic formula may have been a recent experience for you, but my guess is that for just about everybody else it was when you took your last algebra test – or never.

Of course, no reasonable person can doubt the vital importance that mathematics has played in the advancement of societies. Without math there is no chemistry, physics or astronomy, and no Internet or HDTV either.

Nevertheless, as important as the benefits of the science of mathematics are to everyone, the fact of the matter is that most people can, do and will continue to lead very productive lives without having mastered algebra’s algorithms.

An unspoken truth is that not all students who enter high school have the intellectual capacity to be successful in second-year algebra. However, this is an addressable problem. The solution is to apply the same formula that school districts used when they started requiring geometry. “Dummy down” the course as needed.

This approach, however, presents a dilemma for another group of “more algebra” advocates who argue that the primary reason for requiring algebra is not for students to gain familiarity with polynomials, functions, equations, etc. as much as it is for students to internalize the “thinking” required to reach this comfort level.

The argument is that the thought process required to solve simultaneous equations is transferable to real world problems. The extent to which this is true is debatable. What is not debatable, in my view, is that in order to offer a second-year algebra course that every student in the school can pass will require replacing a lot of those thinking experiences with “extra credit” journals and scrapbooks.

Such a universalization of “advanced” algebra will, unintentionally, negate the only real value of the course for the vast majority of high school students – most colleges require it. A student’s high school math record is used by universities as a major tool to gauge a prospective student’s capability to learn at the college level.

The assumption being, of course, that a student who successfully completes advanced math courses is a better risk than one who doesn’t. Advanced math courses are considered good filters, but if algebra II becomes a required subject, universities will properly consider it “basic” rather than “advanced,” and, consequently, a student’s performance in the course will be no more useful to colleges as a gauge than any other required course.

So, the remaining question is how essential to our society is an algebra-literate citizenry? Would we be more secure? More prosperous? If requiring a second year of algebra in high school translated into a new generation of math scientists comprised of those who otherwise would be flipping burgers, that obviously would be a societal gain. But that is no more realistic than requiring every kid in high school to play football with the expectation of developing masses of otherwise undiscovered pros for the NFL.